The Best Sourdough Bread Recipe in the World

I am the sourdough king of the world. But as they say, it’s a small world.

My love of outdoor pursuits is almost eclipsed by my love of sourdough. I’ve  made sourdough pizza, sourdough cinnamon rolls, and sourdough pancakes just to name a few. But my all-time favorite sourdough bake is bread. And I’m quite good at it, if I must say so myself (see first sentence, first paragraph). Within this post, I shall share my recipe for the best sourdough bread in the world. Think about it: The best sourdough bread recipe in the world from the sourdough king of the world. Read on.

First off, you’re going to need a sourdough starter. You can buy sourdough starter from various Internet sources such as Sourdough International, a great resource for sourdoughs from around the world. But I prefer to make my own starter by capturing the wild yeast and essential lactic acid bacteria that invisibly share my home. This makes my starter unique from any other starter on earth. There are lots of places on the Web that will guide you through the no-brainer process of making your own sourdough starter, so this is not our subject. I really want to get to the recipe for the World’s Best Sourdough Bread.

But first, a disclosure. I do not knead the dough by hand. I use a bread machine on the dough cycle. THIS IS NOT CHEATING, at least not by much. And it gives me more time to spend outdoors. So win-win.

The World’s Best Sourdough Bread

The following recipe was originally based on a recipe in Classic Sourdoughs: A Home Baker’s Handbook, by Ed Wood, Ten Speed Press (November 30, 2001), p. 177

Ingredients –

About 3-1/2 cups all purpose flour, unbleached and/or organic if prefered. I use a blend of unbleached white flour and whole wheat in a 2:1 ratio: 2 parts white flour to 1 part whole wheat. I think this improves the taste and makes the bread healthier with the addition of whole grains.

About 1-1/8 cups water (247 grams)

1/2 cup active sourdough starter

About 1 Tbsp vital gluten (20 grams)

Time

Instructions –

First, you may have noticed above the reference to grams. This isn’t just a nod to our metric-minded friends; it’s very important to measure  the ingredients precisely. As a friend once told me, “Cooking is an art, but baking is science.” You’ll need a kitchen scale that will weigh in grams.

1. Place 1/2 cup active culture in bread machine pan with 113 grams flour and 99 grams water. Machine-mix on dough cycle for 15 minutes, turn off bread machine, and allow 6-8 hours for mixture to “proof” or rise and get bubbly.

2. Add 113 grams flour and 99 grams water to bread machine pan, mix on dough cycle for 15 minutes, turn off machine, allow 6-8 hours for mixture to “proof” or rise and get bubbly.

3. Mix 1 tsp salt with 49 grams of water, add to pan, mix on dough cycle just long enough to blend, then add 220 grams flour and 20 grams vital gluten. Mix on dough cycle for 15 minutes.

This next part is especially important. The dough must be at the proper consistency. It should be sticky, but not wet. The dough ball should stick slightly to the sides of the bread machine as it’s being kneaded by the paddle or paddles in the bread machine pan. If it appears too dry, add water about 1/2 Tbsp at a time and allow the bread machine enough time to knead in the water. If the dough appears too wet, add flour 1/2 Tbsp at a time and allow the bread machine enough time to knead in the flour. Keep a record, as the relative humidity in your home will affect the consistency of the dough.

4. When the dough is at the proper consistency, turn off the bread machine, and with hands dusted with flour remove the dough ball and place on a lightly floured board. Shape dough into an elongated shape to fit a standard 9X5X3” bread pan. Loosely cover with plastic wrap floured on one side or sprayed lightly on one side with non-stick vegetable spray. Place coated side down over bread pan. Allow dough to rise until it reaches about 1-1/2” above the lip of the bread pan. This last rise should only take about 3 hours at room temperature.

5. Place bread in cold oven and set temperature for 375 degrees. Oven temperatures vary, so check yours with an oven temp gauge and adjust the temperature accordingly. The purpose of the cold oven is that in response to the heat increase as the oven heats up, the bread dough will raise another inch or two. This is referred to as, “oven spring.” Set timer for 40 minutes. When time expires, check the internal temperature of the loaf at its’ center with a temperature probe. A temperature of 195 degrees means your creation is done. Less, and it means that your bread needs a little more time in the oven.

Cool, slice, and eat. Yum. And now that you have that starter, think of all the other sourdough goodies you can make: pizza, cinnamon rolls, and pancakes are only the beginning! If you have any questions or thoughts, leave a comment or shoot me an email and I’ll get back with you real quick!

 

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Really Quick!

Normally my blog posts are a little longer than this, but I thought you might be interested in listening to a recent podcast featuring yours truly speaking about using goats to pack into the backcountry. You can check it out at https://fishuntamed.com/episode-22/.

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Beating the Coronavirus Blues

“Not for Sale” copyright 2020 Mike L. Raether

I’m trying not to gloat.

As of yesterday, 38 states have issued stay-at-home orders. Montana is one of them. But I’m okay. The stay-at-home orders don’t bother introverts like me. Home is an introvert’s favorite place to be. As much as we love people, people wear us out. What I’m saying is that hermiting doesn’t bother us. Rather, it gives us the perfect excuse to stay home and veg.

However, some of the extroverts I know are having a tough time of it. Extroverts love parties, get-togethers, and other people-gathering events. Why? Because extroverts recharge by being around people. For example, I have a good friend who is an extrovert and married to an introverted wife. When I telephoned my friend a while ago, his wife picked up the call.

“Can I speak to Fred?” I asked.

“No,” she replied, “He’s gone into town visiting to get his daily ‘people fix.’”

However, after a while even introverts get bored with just hanging around the homestead. There’s a big difference with staying home as a choice and being ordered to go home and stay there.

So I thought maybe I’d head to the river and practice some “social distancing.” The powers that be in nearby Washington State have closed all sports fishing until at least April 6. However, our governor Steve Bullock (of who I’m not normally a fan) issued a modified stay-at-home order for Montanans which allows people to leave their homes for “essential activities.” Essential activities are defined as those required for health, safety, and for purchasing necessary consumer items such as groceries (and TP if you can find it). But Bullock’s order allows people to leave their homes for other “essential activities,” which he defined as outdoor-oriented pursuits such as hiking, running, and biking. My interpretation is that fishing is also an essential activity. It is necessary to my health, life, and well-being. If questioned on the riverbank by some nosey snark as to why I’m not staying at home and thereby doing my part to curb the spread of coronavirus, I’ll claim I’m a government official testing the fish for COVID-19. Yeah, that’ll work.

Of course, a guy can’t fish all the time (darn!) so I decided what I really needed was some humor, if not a good belly-laugh, to freshen up my attitude when confined to my home. So I went to YouTube and found some good things with which to amuse myself, and I hope you as well. Here are my suggestions –

The first is, “How Rednecks Prepare for the CORONA VIRUS.” This guy has some really helpful (and unique) ideas about how to protect ourselves from becoming infected.

The second is, “Seems Like The World Is Out Of Toilet Paper.” This vid starts with about a 5-second ad, which you can skip (have you noticed how many ads have suddenly appeared advertising bidets?).

One more:  “A Message From Corona Beer.” No wonder health officials didn’t name it the “Budweiser Virus.”

Oh, I just thought of something else I can do while waiting for this thing to pass: Take a nap. Or naps. Lots of them.

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To Tell the Truth

“Fingers Crossed” copyright 2020 Mike L. Raether

It’s called the game of One-Upmanship:

“I caught more fish than you.”

“So what? I caught the biggest fish.”

When I was writing The Flyfisher’s Guide to Northwest Montana’s Mountain Lakes the pressure was on to catch fish. I even prayed to catch fish. After all, I was supposed to be the expert: what if I didn’t catch any fish?

I was asked this question by a campground host at a drive-in campground while researching the book. I’d chosen this campground as it was central to a few lakes in the area that I wanted to investigate, lakes with short day hikes. The idea was to car-camp while doing a few day hikes to check things out. While chatting with the campground host, I shared why I was there. That’s when the question came: “What if you don’t catch anything?Of course, the question comes in different forms depending on the outdoor activity – 

“Did you get your buck?”

“How was your turkey hunt last season?”

“How many geocaches did you find over the weekend?”

So when I was asked by the campground host what I’d do if I didn’t catch any fish, I paused for a moment, looked at my shoes, and said, “I’ll tell the truth.” Not that I’m bragging. I’ve succumbed to the game of One-Upmanship more often than I like to admit. Maybe I should join a support group where everyone sits in a circle and bares their soul: “Hello, my name is Mike and I’m a One-Upmanship-Aholic. My confession is I didn’t get my buck last season.”

Related to the game of One-Upmanship is the game of Making Excuses such as –

“I woulda got that monster wall hanger if my hunting partner hadn’t bumped my arm just as I shot.”

“I woulda got my gobbler but the hens kept getting in the way.”

“I woulda found a ton of ’caches but my GPS broke.”

What makes us throw in our chips to play the games of One-Upmanship and Making Excuses? Why are we tempted to exaggerate, lie, or justify? Why can’t we just enjoy the experience of _________? (You fill in the blanks).

So I’ve made a decision. I’m gonna tell the truth. Even if it hurts. By the way, speaking of truth, I didn’t get my buck last season. Or my elk. Or my bear. Or my gobbler. Of course, I have good excuses . . .

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Fly Fishing and Life

Fly Fishing Fun on the Clark Fork. Copyright 2020 Mike L. Raether

You can tell a lot about a person by watching them fly fish. Are they patient or easily frustrated? Are they observant or heedless? Do they check their knots after changing flies, or do they recklessly hope for the best? Taking a look at our fly fishing habits will help us know ourselves better, and in the balance we’ll become better fly fishers.  Let me illustrate.

A while ago I was fly fishing the mainstem of the St. Joe River in Idaho, one of the best artificial-lures-only, catch-and-release  waters flowing there. I was fishing with a friend. This friend is not the most patient person in the world and is never really satisfied with the way things are: he is centered on change, and the more change the better.

As I concentrated on the pocket water in front of me, I lost track of my friend. After a few minutes I turned and looked downstream to see how he was doing. The last I saw of him, he was fishing about 50 yards below me.  I was surprised to see that my friend was now 100 yards downstream. I stopped fishing and watched him for a couple of minutes. He would make a couple of fruitless casts, then move a few yards downstream and try again. Soon he was another 30 yards downstream, and the only time his rod bent over was under the strain of a forward cast.

So we have to ask ourselves: Do I thoroughly work a piece of water or do I hurriedly move on if there’s no apparent fishy interest? Patience will put more fish in the net than hopscotching down the river.

How about this one: Do I carefully observe what’s happening in, on, and above the water or do I just fish my favorite fly and hope the fish corporate? Careful observers learn a bit about the local bugs, and consequently hook more fish.

One more: Are my knots snug and tested, or am I not really expecting to wet the net anyway? I’ve noticed that the size and strength of a hooked fish is directly related to how well my tackle is maintained. Big fish just seem to instinctively know if a knot is weak or a drag is set too tight. If I’m good to my stuff, my stuff will be good to me. Paying attention to the details will boost my confidence, confident fishers work harder, and–you guessed it–catch more fish.

Best of all, if I learn patience, practice observance, and form good good habits, I’ll not only be better served on the water, but these qualities will translate to other areas of my life where patience, observation, and good habits are called for.

Don’t you just love win-win scenarios?

 

 

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If You Don’t, Who Will?

Copyright Mike L. Raether 2020

One of the things I really appreciate about Montana is that we don’t make laws to protect people from themselves. For example, if you want to ride a motorcycle without a helmet, it’s your business and perfectly legal. You’re free to spill your brains all over the highway if you like. After all, they’re YOUR brains. Where I live, as long as you have a sewer and electrical permit, your abode need be nothing more than a tarpaper shack.

The beauty of Montana is that you can do whatever you want. But that’s also the ugly thing about Montana: people do whatever they want. Which is fine, unless your neighbor has a dead car collection.

Here in Montana, you’re expected to police yourself which can have a huge negative impact on the environment if you’re a slob. For example, in Mineral County where I hang up my waders, there’s one game warden for all of the county. If I choose to hike into a mountain lake for some fishing, my odds of seeing that game warden are pretty slim. With nobody looking over my shoulder, the responsibility for being legal is mine. Should I decide to scoff the laws, I have to live with myself. As former basketball player and coach John Wooden once said, “The true test of a man’s character is what he does when no one is watching.”

I was reminded of this on a backpacking trip to an alpine lake. This lake offers a wonderful camping spot – or did, before it was trashed by some miscreants. The campfire ring contained some blackened tin cans. Someone had packed in a couple of cans of chili, then tried to burn the empty cans. Empty plastic water bottles defaced the place like pimples on a pretty girl’s face. Nearby I saw where a driftwood log had holes blasted in it by some firearm. I had to shake my head. Those empty cans of chili: Someone packed them in full; couldn’t they have packed them out empty? Same thing with those empty plastic water bottles: How much could they possibly weigh? A couple of grams each maybe? And then there was the piece of bullet-blasted driftwood. A gun range would have been a better choice for target practice, rather than explode the piece and quiet of this pristine place.

So it all comes down to the old adage: pack it in, pack it out, even if it means packing out someone else’s garbage. A little respect for the laws and environment doesn’t take away our pleasure; it adds to it. Let’s all do the right thing. Take home the garbage.

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Ears to Hear

The story continues . . .

Copyright Mike Raether 2019

Last time I wrote about how to evaporate the gloom of winter. I suggested getting outside to be renewed inside. With January cold approaching, this may not be wise or even safe if you live in one of the northern tier states. Montana is no exception. If the weather here plays out as usual, 20 degrees below zero may usher in the Montana New Year.  With this in mind, but even if you live in sunny Florida, I suggest an indoor activity that will not only renews, but entertains and educates.

I’m speaking of exploring the diverse world of podcasts. Without too much effort, you can find podcasts on just about any subject that piques your interest. Just search online for “best podcasts about _______” (you fill in the blank). This is your ticket to some of the best entertainment and education available on the Web. Spend a few minutes poking about the Internet. Make a few notes to self, bookmark a few favs, and by the time the first birds of Spring raise  their voices you’ll be armed with an arsenal of tricks and tips. The Internet isn’t called, “The information superhighway” for nothing.

At the moment, I’m enjoying podcasts about fly fishing. In fact, I was interviewed recently for the Fly Fishing 97 Podcast. If you’re interested, here’s the link to my podcast interview. I’d be flattered if you listen, but please don’t stop there. There’s tons of righteous information on the Fly Fishing 97 podcast.

Now let’s share. Not about the good stuff we’ve learned, but about the podcast treasures we’ve discovered. Come back and share some of your fav URLs with us so we can jump on board!

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Good Medicine

Montana’s Clark Fork River in  winter copyright Mike Raether 2019

What’s a fisher to do? The chill of another Montana winter is upon us. The shortest day of the year, winter solstice, is just around the corner. The mountain lakes lie buried under deep blankets of snow, so hiking to stillwater is out. The nearby river is floating ice, but the ice on the lowland lakes isn’t yet thick enough for safe ice fishing. But I’ve got an itch to get outdoors, and I have to scratch that itch, even if there just isn’t much to do out there at the moment.

At this time of year, it’s easy for me to get frustrated, discouraged, or even depressed. But I found an answer, an answer that might work for you, too.

My solution for evaporating the winter gloom is found next to flowing water, even if that water is floating ice. I find a comfortable perch next to the river, but without fishing rod in hand. I’m not here to take; I’m here to receive. I’m here to let the sound of flowing water cleanse my mind.

And I think. I remember. I meditate. As Herman Melville wrote in his novel Moby Dick,  “…meditation and water are wedded forever.” I let memories flow through my mind as the river water flows on. I remember fish fought, caught, and released. I feast on the memories of laughing wildflowers, the warmth of summer past, the turning leaves of fall, and the chill of that first morning frost.

As I remember, I am refreshed. I am restored. I am healed.  Cares fade away and are replaced by memories of seasons past and fine times. The river flows, bringing peace. Water is life.

What about you? Do you remember the time… Think back. Replay the film. Get outside and you’ll feel better inside. It’s the best medicine.

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Behold the Lowly Fly

Callibaetis Spinner copyright Mike L. Raether, 2019

As a fly fisher, I have a confession. I don’t tie my own flies. To some fly fishers this may seem blasphemous, but, there, I’ve said it. I’ve come out of the closet.

It’s not that I don’t want to learn to tie my own flies. It’s just that I have fumbly fingers. I have enough trouble managing an improved clinch knot, let alone even a humble San Juan Worm. Besides, I’m convinced that the fish aren’t as impressed with my $400 reel spooled with $100 line and attached to my $700 rod as they are with a well-tied munchie. Which brings up something I fail to understand: why do some fly fishers boast about having a $1,000 outfit, but kick about a $2 fly? When is comes right down to it, the fly is The Word. The Connection. The Doer of Business.

As a fly fisher, I have hundreds of flies even though I fall back on about the same dozen patterns. But like most fly fishers, I just can’t help adding to my collection. I rarely drive past a fly shop without stopping and checking the fly selection. I enjoy examining them, dreaming, supposing, hoping. If I don’t have a fly that fools fish, I might as well take up water polo.

So what makes a good fly? First off, it doesn’t need to be a dead ringer for the natural. There are flies such as the Royal Wulff that don’t imitate anything in the wild; they’re know as “attracter patterns” and sometimes outfish everything else. Then there are general patterns like the Hare’s Ear that imitate a broad range of nymphs and midge pupa. So again, what makes a good fly? Here we go –

  • Price. We all know the old saying, “You get what you pay for,” meaning that if you buy cheap, you’re gonna get cheap. Not always true when it comes to flies. It’s possible to pay $5 or more for incredibly perfect flies that are dead ringers for the naturals, but such flies are often better for framing than fly fishing. Flies don’t have to be pretty to work. Even the ugliest tie job can fool fish. Decently-tied flies are available on the Internet for less that $1 each. Price can be an indicator of quality, but not always.
  • Durability. Although they don’t have to be pretty, they do have to be tied well enough to withstand being whipped through the air, drug through water, and catch a few fish before they become bedraggled. If that little bit of fluff, fur, and feathers falls apart after a few casts and a fish or two, the money you paid for it would have been better living in your pocket.
  • Craftsmanship. Is the hook eye free of head cement? Sure, a fisher can use the pokie on the nipper to open the eye, but should you have to? Care in the application of head cement so it doesn’t clog the hook eye can be an indicator of quality and care on the part of the fly tier.  Is the dubbing tight and secure around the hook shank? If the fly features eyes, are they tied on straight and  well secured to the hook?

Well, there you have them: my three primary criteria for fly selection. What are yours? Do you have any tips for us? Leave us a comment to help us out!

 

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The Three Most Important Things to Teach Your Pup

“What’s next, Boss?” Copyright Mike Raether 2019

First off, I don’t understand the phrase, “It’s a dog’s life” like it’s a bad thing.  I disagree. Think about it: for a dog, life is nothing more than eating, sleeping, playing, and chewing up slippers. I kind of envy this, except for the “chewing up slippers” part. Nevertheless, other than the basics, there are three things every pup should learn and I’m pleased to pass them on to you at absolutely no charge. Before I forget, you’re welcome.

The first thing to teach your pup is how to pee on command. Really. This is so handy. Who of us likes taking the dog out for the last time at night and waiting while he/she sniffs every blade of grass until she/he finds just the right spot? (Notice how I wrote “he/she” and then “she/he”? Clever. But I digress.) The solution is teaching your dog how to pee on command. You, too, can have your very own pee-on-command dog and impress your friends.

However, before I reveal the process I must disclose a qualifier. It’s been my experience that this works with pups, but not so much with adult dogs. At least, I tried it once with an adult dog and he didn’t get it. Or perhaps he just didn’t think it was any of my business where he lifted his leg. Anyway, on with the lesson –

Take your dog outside (I assume you want your dog to relieve him/herself outside and not in the house) and let her/him find just the right spot. Mine likes the neighbor’s property best and that suits me just fine. When your dog (finally) voids, just say “Do it” or “Go potty” or whatever other command you want to use. As the dog does its’ business, repeat the chosen command over and over. Before long, when you give the command your dog will obey. Just never use the command in the house.

The second most important thing to teach your pup is not to chew stuff up, especially your slippers. Keep in mind while teaching this lesson that dogs like to chew. You’ll never break a dog of chewing. It’s what they do, in addition to eating, sleeping, and playing, but you can teach them how to chew stuff selectively.  Most pups learn this fairly quick.

When you see your pup chewing up (for example) one of your slippers, take the slipper way from the dog and give it something it’s permitted to chew, like a bone with a few goodies left on it (your dog won’t care if the goodies have dried up and turned black. And a little odor makes the bone all the more appealing). Instead of a bone, you could use a stuffed dog toy. As you take the item from the pup, say, “This is mine. You may not chew up (destroy, consume, tear apart) what is mine. This other thing is also mine, but I’ll let you have it so you may chew it up (destroy it, consume it, tear it apart) instead of the slipper which is mine.” However, now that I  think of it, this command may be too long for a pup to understand. Perhaps just a simple “No” along with the exchange would suffice.

The third and last command is probably the easiest but the most important: “Let’s go take a nap.” As dogs spend about 90% of their time napping, this trick ought to come to them naturally. This skill is best taught by example. ‘Nuff said. Speaking of naps…

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