Tag Archives: fly fishing guide

Picture Perfect

A Nice Clark Fork River Cutthroat, copyright 2018 Mike L. Raether

So you caught a monster fish, were inspired by great views, and had a wonderful trip. Can you capture the memory? Well, no, not exactly. Feelings can’t be recorded on photos. But this doesn’t mean you can’t share the memories.

However, poor photography is lifeless and boring. How can we make our photos exciting? How can we tell the story? How can we make them shine?

I’m still learning the “how” of this, even though I supplied all but one of the photos in my book, Flyfisher’s Guide to Northwest Montana’s Mountain Lakes, due to release next month by Wilderness Adventures PressHowever, I’d like to pass along a few of the things I’ve learned to my photographically-inclined friends.

First off, if you’re serious get serious equipment. Forget about using the camera on your smartphone. It’s okay for grabbing quick pics and sticking them under the noses of your victims, but not if you’re serious. Get a good DSLR and a compliment of lenses, such as a micro lens for close-ups, a mid-range zoom such as 18-70 mm for wide angle to standard stuff, and about a 70-300 mm telephoto zoom lens. Zoom lenses are sometimes snubbed by snobby photographers, but the newer zoom lenses take some pretty good stuff, even good enough for publication. You’re also going to need a good tripod, especially for low light conditions and telephoto work. I’ve bought much of my equipment from B&H and have been very happy with them.

Second, learn how to use the various custom settings of your DSRL, such as aperture, shutter, and manual settings. Once you learn how to use the “professional” settings, you won’t go back to the “auto” setting. Commercial photographer Bryan Peterson has some great resources to help with this. Like it or not, you’re going to have to study.

Third, practice. Take a lot of photos. Learn about the varying qualities of light. Learn how to see creatively. One of the beauties of digital photography is that you have access to almost instant editing. If you don’t like some of the stuff you snapped, delete. Delete. DELETE.

Fourth, and this is where fishing comes in, whether of people or fish or both, unless you’re doing a panoramic get close. Fill the frame.

Last for now, if you’re trying for close-ups of live fish, keep your hands out of the way. Remember, your subject is the fish, not your thumbs. Cradle live fish, and include a background of water and/or net. Personally, I think dead fish pictures suck, with the exception of photos of fish on the Bar-B. Or perhaps a piece of BBQ’d fish on a fork on its way to your very eager and wide open mouth. Again, get creative.

Well, that’s enough from me. But maybe you’d like to pass along some tips? You can comment by clicking “leave a comment” under the title of this post, send me an e-mail, or even subscribe to my blog.

The Poodle Doodle

During Montana’s fishing season I work part time at a local fly shop. The owner, fishing guide Joe Cantrell is great guy. He lets me bring my dog to work. Allow me to rephrase that last remark: I’m required to bring my dog to work. I think that if I didn’t bring Sophie to work, Joe would send me home to get her. I really think she ought to be on the payroll, but so far I haven’t been able to get Joe to sign off on that.

You may remember meeting Sophie in my blog entry of June, 2014. Sophie is my standard poodle who will be three years of age in a few weeks. Her birthday is Feb. 17, just in case you want to send her a card. Or a dog bone. Or maybe both.

Sophie loves everybody. When a customer enters the shop, she often stands on her hind legs with both of her front feet straight in the air as if to offer a High Ten.

It’s amazing how many people in Montana aren’t familiar with standard poodles. Maybe it’s because not many are seen in Montana. I’ve received comments like, “I didn’t know poodles could be so big!” (Sophie weighs about 50 pounds). But my favorite comment came from a customer who entered the shop, took a look at Sophie and asked, “What kind of a doodle is this?”

You’re probably aware that standard poodles are sometimes crossed with Labrador Retrievers and Golden Retrievers. The results are called, “Labradoodles” and “Golden Doodles” respectively. The hoped-for product in both cases is a dog that features a heavier build, has a strong hunting instinct, retains the intelligence of all three breeds, and has the hallmark, non-shedding coat of the poodle.

So the customer’s question, “What kind of a doodle is this?” was fair question – but I just couldn’t resist offering a smart-aleck reply:

“She’s a poodle-doodle.”

There’s a story behind how this Montana outdoorsman ended up with a poodle, and for that I refer you to article mentioned above. I really didn’t know much about standard poodles when I got her. But now I wouldn’t trade her for a whole herd of Labs.

How do I love thee, my poodle? Let me count the ways –

  • Poodles do not shed. They have hair instead of fur, making them pretty much hypoallergenic.
  • Sophie doesn’t smell like a dog, although sometimes her feet get a little stinky.
  • They’re scary-smart. I remember taking Sophie on a cross country hike last summer. The grass was taller than she was, so as she wandered out ahead she kept losing track of me. Finally she jumped up on a stump to see where I was. I’ve never seen a dog use a stump as a step stool before. That’s pretty smart.
  • They’re incredible watch dogs. We have a large front window in our living room with a bench underneath. Sophie spends hours sitting on that bench staring and out of the window. If anything moves out in the pasture, be it nothing more than a mouse, Sophie will let me know about it.
  • She’s exceptionally “birdy” and has a great nose. Most people don’t know it, but poodles were originally used as hunting dogs and they still make great hunters if they’re bred for it. She even has the webbed feet of a water retriever.

So my advice to you? If you’re ready for a dog, get a poodle-doodle. They’re only #8 on the American Kennel Club’s list of most popular dogs, but I’ve concluded that Poodles Are America’s Best Dogs. But then again, this advice is from a guy that owns a pack goat.

But wait, there’s more! (I’m being facetious of course, but there really is more). I’m interested in your thoughts. You can reply, send me an email, and/or help design the new monthly newsletter –