Tag Archives: sportsman

A Sportsman Looks at Gun Control

I hate to admit I even thought of this – it’s a horrible thought, but it could be true.

“I guess we’ll just go home” by Elipongo, licensed under CC 4.0

Let’s suppose that in order to restrict access to guns, the anti-gunners are willing to consider students and other mass shooting victims as sacrificial lambs. You know, sacrifice the victims in pursuit of what they feel is the greater good: the removal of our constitutional right to keep and bear arms.

Every time there’s a school or other mass shooting we get a knee-jerk reaction from some on the left: “We have to have more gun control! We have to outlaw ‘assault weapons!’ We have to make it harder for people to get guns!” And so it goes, on, and on, and on…

Seems ironic – to put it politely – that many progressives would like the Supreme Court to revisit its ruling on the Second Amendment, but certainly NOT its ruling on Roe v. Wade.

I’m old, so I remember when you could buy a gun from a mail-order catalog and have it delivered to your home. The thing I don’t remember is a bunch of mass shootings as a consequence. But then again, like I said I’m old so maybe I don’t remember correctly (but I do remember when the Boy Scouts . . . ).

To me, the bottom line is this: the problem isn’t guns; the problem is sick people.

What if more time, money, and effort was focused on identifying dangerously sick people and finding help for them instead of pushing for more gun control laws? Of course, first we have to make it safe to reveal mental illness struggles, but that’s a whole different issue. More laws are not the answer; some of the places in our country that have the most restrictive gun control laws also have the most gun-related crimes, such as murder.

I’m fortunate to live in Montana, where we have the some of the least restrictive gun laws. For example, I can carry a concealed weapon without a permit anywhere in Montana except for in incorporated cities (and of course, banks, government buildings, bars, and so on).

Got a story for ya. I live in the country and offer an RV site to tourists and others. A man once knocked on my door and asked to pitch his tent overnight. I didn’t really like the looks of the guy, and I noticed California plates on his vehicle (not that I have anything against Californians, per se), so I declined and suggested some free local options for camping. His expression revealed fear. He said, “But people in Montana have guns don’t they?”

Yeah, over 20% of us do, and that’s why a guy doesn’t have to worry much. A person with a gun is just as likely to protect you as herself. And bad guys usually don’t mess with Montanans as they just might be risking their lives by picking on a legit gun owner. In Montana, we can use lethal force against an assailant if we feel our lives are threatened, even if we’re not at home.

These are my thoughts – what about yours? You can leave a comment by clicking/tapping “Comments” under the title.

Mineral County, Montana: An Outdoorsman’s Overview

I was stunned. It was abundantly more than I could ask or think.

When I arrived in heavily forested Mineral County in far Western Montana, one of the first things I did was spread out a USDA Forest Service map for the Superior Ranger District. As an outdoorsman, I wanted to learn about where I’d landed. What I discovered was an outdoorsman’s jaw dropper.

Bonanza Lake #1. Photo copyright by Mike L. Raether

First off, Mineral County is 87% publicly owned, and these public lands contain hundreds of miles of non motorized recreational trails. My new “back yard” was home to over 50 mountain lakes, most accessible only by trail and many with good to excellent trout fishing. All mine for the hiking.

And then there is the Clark Fork River with its many tributaries. The Clark Fork is big water that drains most of Western Montana. Although the Clark is overshadowed by the abundance of Montana’s blue ribbon trout waters, the Clark yields beautiful fish up to five pounds for those who learn how to fool ’em. The Clark’s tribs are fair to excellent fishing for brookies, cutts, ‘bows and sometimes big bull trout (be sure to check the regs).

Did I mention the hunting? No, not yet, but as some of you were wondering if I’d get there, here we go –

First, I have to deconstruct your thinking.

Montana in general is not the hunter’s paradise some make it out to be. There’s not a big game animal standing behind every tree or game birds flushing from every bush. Still, the hunting is pretty good, and there’s a certain romanticism connected with hunting in Montana. However, for sheer numbers, a hunter would be better off elsewhere.

But  back to Mineral County. I enjoy good hunting here and the proof is mounted on my walls. The hunting pressure is light if a hunter is willing to get back in the bush a quarter mile or so. Still, the mountains of Mineral County have been called “young men’s mountains” as they are steep and heavily forested. But a seasoned hunter knows that elk and deer don’t usually go straight up the mountain; they’re much smarter than that. They make trails. And a hunter who finds the game trails and uses them finds it much easier to get around the mountains. And he saves a lot of sweat and energy in the process.

Rivers, streams, mountains, lakes, trails, wildlife – yeah, I like it here. I also like sharing. By the way, how about sharing with me? What are your favorite things to do in the great outdoors? Or perhaps you have a question or suggestion?

But wait, there’s more! (I’m being facetious of course, but there really is more). I’m interested in your thoughts. You can reply, send me an email, and/or help design the new monthly newsletter –